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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. hurricane thin the is not only wreaking havoc which residents, but it has forced an awkward pause one night before the election. we have a look of the state of the race and how it has impacted the campaign schedule with jonathan martin. as polls continue to tighten, the race could boil down to not just a handful of swing states but to a handful of counties within those states. >> there is a saying dr. king had that says it is always the right thing. we know we are only about half way to defeating honker. region in h-- walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as hurricane sandy continues to churn, our thoughts are with those who are dealing with loss of power. it has created an awkward situation with the presidential campaign just days to go. we are grateful jonathan martin joins us this evening. good he is the senior reporter for public ago. thank you for being here. fellowalk about the citizens impacted by
whose gang name was smiley. he is written about in my book. smiley was a young man of 19, when i first sat down with him at home when industries. one thing he said to me was -- why was no one there for me. why does no one speak to me and why did nobody tried to stop this. he was arrested when he was 16 years old. he was told to lie about his age and say he was 18, so they could be together in jail. and from there his story unfolded. different things were done with him. ultimately, spile -- smiley was helped, but his words haunted me. why did no one speak to me, and why did no one tried to stop me. i began to listen to the stories of the gang members, and my research team at ucla discovered some startling truths. gang members to leave the gangs. they leave the gang for a variety of reasons. they all have a turning point, when they decide to leave. and it changes them. this would be something that any of you would logically imagine. for female gang members, and we did not see many of them on that video, but they are out there. they are not mothers, they are active gang members. female ga
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight marked the final time both candidates can address their issues, as the third and final debate next week deals solely with policy. there has been little mentioned about them many americans who now find themselves near the poverty level. how can it be that a country with such a noble history of social justice failed to do this? tonight, peter dreier. from -- peter dreier, from occidental college. his latest book is called 2: "the 100 greatest americans of the 20th century." we are glad to have you with our conversation with peter dreier, coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: peter dreier is a professor
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. with all three presidential debates behind us, the next two weeks will be a sprint to the finish line in what is virtually a dead heat. election night could be a long night with a couple of key swing states out west possibly holding the key to the race. tonight, we will look at the impact of the west with adam nagourney, l.a. bureau chief for the new york times. his thoughts on a controversial anti-union proposition in california and we would discuss the passing of a liberal lion over the weekend, george mcgovern. a conversation with adam nagourney of the new york times coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you.
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, we continue our road to health series with one of the most overlooked aspects of health care, the doctor-patient relationship. dr. peter ubel is a scientist at duke university, who looks at how decisions are made and why. communications may hold the key for health care. his new book is called "critical decisions." we are glad you could join us with dr. peter ubel. right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. peter ubel is a widely respected scientist and physicians at duke university. his latest text is called "critical decisions." do
. good to have you. see you next time. today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a look at the role of the latino vote this election plus the r&b artist. that is next time. we will see you then. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. >> be more. pbs. here in cambridge, massachusetts. today, we'll start the ceiling work on the first floor. tom: all right, that's it. norm: we'll learn more about swedish style.
ann smiley did not ask for their fates. a young woman i worked with, who has five children and has been a member of valencia 13, and finally once to leave the gang, she did not ask for her fate. we need to listen to the needs -- providing them with jobs, with law enforcement and the community, we need to merge. you need to collaborate. you cannot speak to one another, you need to talk together. this is the challenge. i want to urge everyone in the audience, i take strength from those words, from that question as bobby threw down the gauntlet 30 years ago. you said you would always be there for me. meaning, the there in force, together with the understanding. thank you very much. >> let me begin this the scutcheon. you work every day with gang members. you were once a gang member yourself. why do you think you are effective working with young people and what does this mean to you and how we know that this is working. first of all, i want to thank god for his grace. i work with united players. i do reentry and the youth involved in juvenile delinquency. the majority of the kids i wor
slasher movie called "smiley" released today. nbc's mike taibbi has the details on this story. mike, good morning? here's the problem for michael gallagher. the bad guys in his website include a shadoey website and hacker group who has in the past penetrated government agencies and personal lives and once the online entities were mentioned in the film, gallagher and those close to him were targeted. >> tried to kill me. >> reporter: title character "smiley" is an urban legend killer who prowls for victims in the dark corners of the internet. >> you called smiley, and he came. >> reporter: dark corners that include the controversial message board 4chan and the hacker group anonymous. just a plot device, gallagher says, based on what is known about those so-called hacktivists. >> they communicate by sending pornographic images and gore and violence and very disturbing messages. >> reporter: gallagher, 23, and his 24-year-old lead actor, shane dawson, are internet entrepreneurs who have been posting videos for years on youtube and other sites. between them they have so many followers that th
not be the strongest padler, but she's more than capable. >> reporter: she created "smiley riley's beach bash," an annual event for kids with down syndrome and their families. it led special olympics to include surfing. >> she understands. she has the knowledge of being able to deal with a special needs athlete. and she also has the knowledge to understand what their limitations are and she can push them knowing full well she has a special needs child that she pushes too. >> reporter: reneau is working to get other states like california to hold competitions like this. if that happens the national special olympics told her the next step is for surfing to become a demonstration sport at a future summer games. >> how commitrd you to making this happen? >> i'm going to do whatever i'm able to do. not just kids with down syndrome but kids with autism and developmental delays. >> emily foster rode her wave back to her thrilled family. for cbs "this morning," mark strassman in cocoa beach, florida. >>> it remind me of the old line that what you can imagine you can do. >> you can do. yes. every tim
we use emoticons. i'm smiley. say yes to coffee. too awkward if you don't. be sure to drop your boyfriend at some point over the next few days. >> reporter: the advice was good advice? >> it was really good advice. >>> okay. let's put chris and tim to the live test right now. you guys, amy and josh, you have actual texts that came in? >> yep. >> number one -- >> love you. >> ah. >> to the moon and back and around the milky way. >> please bring an iphone car charger. guys? >> what do you think? >> that doesn't sound so good. >> yeah. >> audience, what do you think? >> really? that's really shocking. >> undecided? >> maybe. >> you have faith. >> that's less helpful. it was cool hanging out. >> yeah. if you're going out tonight, bring ali? we're going to jimmy's. >> awesome. will tell her. can't wait to see you. >> okay. >> okay? >> not a good sign if you're saying okay after you said you're excited to see him. >> and how about telling her to bring a friend? >> i think she should not go. >> can i see one? really? i think he's pretty decided. here we go. so, my parents are going to
'm not sure what it looks like. >> it's a smiley face. >> all right. i can do that. >>> clayton, you wonder about getting your plants inside. the first real freeze of the season across the ohio valley, parts of michigan and pennsylvania. tonight into tomorrow morning, very cold night and it might be the end of growing season for a lot of people. as you wake up, you see this cold pocket into the northern plains. 23 in rapid city, 28 in denver. cold air across texas. in texas, you're not going to warm up much today as the sun shines because the temps are so cold. this rain is bringing scattered showers towards the mid-atlantic. the northeast, light showers and not scattered. not big problems for the day. across the west, a ton of sunshine. we're in a very dry stretch in the northwest. the pattern continues. we have had .23 inches of rain. 73 today in seattle, warm across the southwest. still next couple of days into the 90's. a little bit of a break and warm up in the central plains. i got nervous with the perfection thing. you set me up. >> no, you hit the mark. >>> coming up on the show, an
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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